Archive for February, 2013


mindful interior design

     You’ve heard of “recycling” materials. And for most of us that means throwing your glass, paper and plastics into a separate bin when taking out the trash. You may have even heard of or have seen some products being recycled and used in different pieces of artwork. It’s fun to see human ingenuity! But here is an awesome look at just a few “repurposed” design accomplishments by designers in Amsterdam (Interior Design magazine) for you to enjoy!

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Shape of Things to Come

As may be apparent, 2013 has got off to a busy start for me. Summers in Hobart are jam-packed with things to do, I’ve struggled to find time to write and I’m not as on top of things as I’d like to be.

It can be challenging to maintain balance during busy times and so often I hear people say that they’d like to be more environmentally-sound in their choices but they lead busy lives and they just can’t find the time. And so we let unsustainable choices sneak into our busy lives. We go to the supermarket to do our shopping, instead of visiting the local grocer and the farmer’s market. We drive places instead of cycling or walking. We buy ready-made and processed foods to eat on the run. Gardens get neglected… In the name of convenience, of saving time, we make a thousand small choices that make…

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studentexistence

Since taking the year off I have worried about how much I will remember from my first year, and panicking about how much I don’t know. One thing that has stuck with me through all the months off, is the thought of how much food is wasted. That one lecture made such an impact, that just over a year ago I wrote a blog about food waste.

What I learnt in that lesson has made me think about all sorts of waste, and these past few months working in a big firm situated in the middle of Canary Wharf it seems to be all I can see.

Just before Christmas I was sat eating my lunch at my desk and I put the plastic bag that it came in in a box under my desk. (You never know when you may need a plastic bag). It was then that I…

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Intercon

trash stream from electronicsOver the past two decades the evolution of consumer electronics have cause massive amounts of information to migrate from the physical world of paper into the digital network of electrons. Throughout that time increases in efficiency and capability have shrunk the physical size of computers while expanded the capacity for information and exponentially increased speed to move it back and forth. The same progression, however, has led to a new, complex and rapidly growing waste stream that we know relatively little about. At the same time, the lifecycle of our paper products has not been idle. Steadily improving forestry practices, more efficient production methods and vast improvements in recycling make paper a much greener option than it was years ago. More and more, we need to consistently reevaluate which medium is offering us the most sustainable option.

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eScrapBeat

Some electronics have been upgradable for nearly all of their lives. For example, most people don’t toss their desktop PCs when they want to add a stick or two of RAM, and retail outlets, from electronics stores to big-box department stores, now carry components like external and internal hard drives and new video cards. Cameras can swap out different lenses and flashes. Video game console companies develop new types of controllers and accessories that use everything from body weight to posture to interact with their products.
Television sets, however, are another matter. When consumers wanted the newest features in a TV set for the family room, the old TV was relegated to storage, or to the curb.
TV technology is changing rapidly. In the course of a few years, TV manufacturers have introduced 3D technology for home viewing, smart TVs that connect to the internet without additional hardware and ever-improving…

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Upcycling at its finest!

Utopian Dreaming

There are few things sadder than a junk yard full of broken down old cars.  They’re like rusty souvenirs of the failed (and continuously failing) American dream.  Not only did these poor machines unknowingly burn up our skies, but they weren’t made to last or have second lives.
bikesc

That’s why this  company’s project is so appreciated.  LOLA Madrid has found a way to give old clunkers new life in a far more sustainable and healthy means of transportation –bicycles.  The cars’ upholstery is used to make seats, doors become part of the frame, turn signals become reflective lights; the list goes on and on.  No longer do these dismal roadsters need to sit abandoned in the lot.  They can bring joy to people once again, helping with the issue of recycling old materials as well as providing a healthier, more eco-friendly way to get from A to B.  Wonderful!

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Counterintuitive…

Transition Town Payson

What is Upcycling and what does it have to do with the environment?

I never gave much thought about taking waste materials and using them to make something useable.  I used to just think that was just recycling.  But noooo…I have learned a new word!

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Upcycling is the process of converting waste materials or useless products into new materials or products of better quality or for better environmental value.

The term Upcycling came from Germany

The upcycling concept was the title of the German book written by Gunter Pauli in 1997, the free translation of Upsizing (the opposite of Downsizing) book first published in 1996. The German edition was adapted to the German language and culture by by Johannes F. Hartkemeyer, then Director of the Volkshochschule in Osnabruck. The concept was later incorporated by William McDonough and Michael Braungart in their 2002 book Cradle to…

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